Tag Archives: book

How Katie Got a Voice (and a Cool New Nickname)

  • Author – Pat Mervine
  • # of Pages – 26
  • *includes illustrations

How Katie Got a Voice (and a Cool New Nickname) is a story told by a fourth grade classmate of Katie, the new girl in school. Everyone in the school has a nickname related to individual interests and personalities. When Katie comes into the class, the students are eager to involve her in their activities and to learn what is special about her. This proves to be quite a challenge. Katie has significant physical disabilities. How can Katie fit in with her classmates when she can’t even talk? When Katie is introduced to assistive technology, she is finally able to communicate with her new friends. As a result, the students are delighted to see her as a person with many interests and abilities, just like them. Katie knows she is a valued member of the school when she is given her own special nickname.

Just like its theme, there is a very special concept that differentiates between this book and many other books for young readers. Most times stories written for young kids try to emphasize the idea that being different is okay, and go against the idea of herd mentality – a term that describes how people are influenced by their peers to adopt certain behaviors, follow trends, and/or purchase items. In this case, the book’s starting point is that everyone is different. Miguel, nicknamed “The Punster,” makes up nicknames for kids and staff at school based on what makes them unique (such as Picasso the painter or Tunes the music lover). When Katie shows up he can’t figure out a name for her since she can’t… do anything. Katie doesn’t move or play or talk. She just laughs and looks around. Usually, Katie would be the “special” one, as we often use the word “special” in a negative connotation to hint at disabled kids. However, here her disability specifically is not considered an issue with the kids, they just can’t figure out how to include her in the group. After explaining the issue to her teacher Katie gets sent to a speech therapist, and eventually is connected to a machine that allows her to draw, play music and even talk! The kids, by turn, exclaim out loud that Katie can now participate in their hobbies – reading, painting, playing music, and even cheerleading for the sports team. Now, when they can get to know her, Katie can be given a nickname as well, one that showcases, of course, her uniqueness.

The book How Katie Got a Voice takes a very delicate subject and handles it beautifully. It shows kids that being unique is important, and it also teaches skills such as asking for help and including everyone in the group. When the kids don’t know how to play with Katie or share their hobbies with her they turn to a teacher for help. They don’t avoid Katie, or the problem at hand, and instead choose to actively search for a solution. They want to be able to hang out with their new friend, even if she’s unlike any other kid they’ve met, because that’s what makes kids cool – being different. Moreover, the book had both male and female characters. Many books these days don’t have enough important female characters with actual lines and importance, and so it’s important to start writing well developed characters for both genders in books aimed at kids and young children.

The book’s last pages include some simple tips for kids when dealing with people with disabilities, such as not staring at them or asking about their condition unless they bring it up first. The tips explain that even when someone needs an interpreter or assistant to communicate, you should speak to the person and not the companion, and most importantly, be patient. The author’s website includes a PowerPoint presentation called “Katie’s Lesson in Disability Etiquette,” aimed to help teachers introduce students to the topic.

In conclusion, this is a very good book for kids. It’s relatively short and easy to read, allowing young kids to read it themselves. The illustrations are colorful and very pretty. More importantly, the book deals with many important subjects that parents often don’t know how to bring up with their kids. How Katie Got a Voice can assist parents and teachers in introducing these topics and starting discussions about them with their children. I highly recommend the book both for reading at home, and for reading in class.

*I received a free copy of this book from Story Cartel in exchange for my honest review.

 

Top Ten Tuesday – Books I Wouldn’t Mind Santa Bringing Me (December 24th)

Hey everyone! It seems like everything on the Internet these days has to do with Christmas, including this week’s Top Ten Tuesday topic, hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. I do not celebrate Christmas, so I guess this is more of a

Books I Wouldn’t Mind People Bringing Me

  1. Maus, Art Spiegelman – this is one of the books I’m planning to read for the ERC challenges. Unfortunately, I highly doubt I’m going to aquire this in any way other than ordering it from Amazon and waiting for someone to bring it to me, or pay the crazy shipping rates. So yes, Santa would be nice. No international shipping fees, thank you very much.
  2. Humans of New York, Brandon Stanton – I really want to get this for my birthday. The photographs are beautiful, but it’s the captions that made me fall in love with the man and the concept. And the book looks amazing.
  3. The Letter Q: Queer Writers’ Notes to their Younger Selves – seems like an interesting choice for ERC 2013 LGBT category. I want to get into reading more non-fiction.
  4. The Zombie Survival Guide, Max Brooks – a book I wanna hold in my hands, not read on a Kindle.
  5. Flash Fiction: 72 Very Short Stories
  6. Not Quite What I Was Planning: Six-Word Memoirs from Writers Famous & Obscure
  7. I Can’t Keep My Own Secrets–Six-Word Memoirs by Teens Famous & Obscure
  8. Tweeting the Universe: Tiny Explanations of Very Big Ideas
  9. Waiting to Be Heard: A Memoir, Amanda Knox
  10. The Woman Who Can’t Forget: The Extraordinary Story of Living with the Most Remarkable Memory Known to Science – A Memoir, Jill Price

Wow, seems like I really do have a bunch of non-fiction books here, compared to my usual fiction to non-fiction reading ratio. I got into memoirs because of the ERC challenges, and then read maybe two or three last year and am planning to cover at least four or five this coming year. A bunch of these aren’t exactly “reading books,” such as Six-Word works, but they’re books I’d like to have available on my shelf for whenever I feel like browsing through some short pieces. The choices this week are actually a lot different from my usual choices during these Top Ten Tuesdays. Have to admit I’m pretty pleased.

Any of you share the same books as me? Different? Let us all know in the comments below!

EDIT: Yes, I’m the type of person who writes up a post four days in advance and then doesn’t post on time.

Annual End of Year Book Survey – 2013 – Part 3(/3)

This is the last post for my End of Year Survey series, the idea that originated from Jamie @ Perpetual Page Turner. Part 1 can be found here. Part 2 can be found here. To avoid unneccessary repetition, I might not expand on each book because I tend to have similar answers for many questions. Also, removed questions about 2013 debuts because I HAVEN’T READ ANY. I really need to work on that for next year. And one question whose answer has appeared a million times and I keep using the same books for everything so, ya know, unneccesary question.

  • Favorite Relationship From A Book You Read In 2013 (be it romantic, friendship, etc)?

World Cup Wishes (משאלה אחת ימינה) by Eshkol Nevo – best guy friendship I’ve ever read about. I tend to read more… books that include mainly female frienships. Not many people write GOOD “bromances” and this book does that so beautifully it makes your heart hurt.

  • Favorite Book You Read in 2013 From An Author You’ve Read Previously?

Beauty Queens by Libba Bray. Going Bovine, which I read last year, was great but this was a WHOLE other level.

  • Best Book You Read In 2013 That You Read Based SOLELY On A Recommendation From Somebody Else?

World Cup Wishes (משאלה אחת ימינה) by Eshkol Nevo. Not going to elaborate, too much repetition. It’s brilliant.

  • Genre You Read The Most From in 2013?

I think Young Adult. Makes sense.

  • Newest fictional crush from a book you read in 2013?

Hm. Maybe Todd from Tom Perrotta’s Little Children. I really like young father characters, and his personality is really good. I like how he acts with Sarah, and the fact that he’s a stay at home dad is awesome.

  • Most vivid world/imagery in a book you read in 2013?

Room by Emma Donoghue. Reading such an intense book over such a short period of time is insane. It’s one of the worst cases of returning-to-real-life that I’ve ever had. Not sure if it’s really vivid world, but it was definitely an extreme, very vivid mental state.

  • Book That Was The Most Fun To Read in 2013?

This is too hard so instead of choosing a book I’ve already used in a million other questions I’ll go with Orange is the New Black: My Year In a Woman’s Prison by Piper Kerman because there was the extra joy that came with knowing that once I finish I can start watching the TV show. In fact, I was going to watch it, discovered there was a book, downloaded it and read it in three days, and then marathoned the entire show in less than 72 hours. I’m also kind of proud of the fact that I can say I read it BEFORE I watched it.

  • Book That Made You Cry Or Nearly Cry in 2013?

Room by Emma Donoghue. Read all of my other posts. I’ll save ya’ll the lovey dovey word vomit on this one.

  • Book You Read in 2013 That You Think Got Overlooked This Year Or When It Came Out? 

Kind of hard to answer considering I am not aware of many books until I discover them msyelf. This question is kind of weird, don’tcha think?

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I think these three posts can be summed up as Beauty Queens by Libba Bray, World Cup Wishes (משאלה אחת ימינה) by Eshkol Nevo, Room by Emma Donoghue. I guess when a book is relevant to so many “Best Book About _______” questions, it must really be incredible. The moral of the story, kids, is go read ’em!

Do the survey yourself! It’s fun to go over your reading for the year and remember so many great (or not so great) moments. Is there anything you plan on rereading? What was your favorite? Answer the survey and link below! I’d love to hear what you all loved, and get some new recommendations myself!

Annual End of Year Book Survey – 2013 – Part 2(/3)

Part two of my 3 part survey series! (sounds fancy when you put it that way). Credit, of course, to the wonderful lady at Perpetual Page Turner and her post, which can be found at – 4th Annual End of Year Book Survey.

You can find Part 1 here, where I answered questions 1-9.

  • Favorite cover of a book you read in 2013?
  1. Little Children by Tom Perrotta
  2. Beauty Queens by Libba Bray
  3. Orange Is The New Black by Piper Kerman

        

  • Most memorable character in 2013?

Not too sure about this one. Douglas Adams’ Dirk Gentley is definitely a memorable guy, but I’m going to go with Ram Mohammad Thomas from Q & A by Vikas Swarup. It’s usually easier to connect to the character telling the story, and Ram’s is told beautifully – due to both content and writing.

  • Most beautifully written book read in 2013?

Room by Emma Donoghue. The entire story is written from the point of view of a five year old boy. It’s a chilling, calmingly scary story and the POV makes it both creepier and more beautiful. The idea to tell a story through a character that doesn’t understand what’s going on most of the time is absolutely brilliant, and the writing is fantastic. World Cup Wishes (משאלה אחת ימינה) by Eshkol Nevo is pretty close though, maybe even just as great.

  • Book that had the greatest impact on you in 2013? 

Room by Emma Donoghue. The story was so intense it was hard to break out of the mood for a couple of days at least, if not more. I read the entire book in around twenty four hours and I was so into it that when I finished returning to the world felt like I’d fallen out of the sky and landed head first on the ground. Unfortunately, I also realized just how… how not-so-outta-this-world kidnapping is, which was not a very great conclusion to reach around the same time the news was filled with stories about the Castro kidnapper.

I feel like it’s also neccesary to mention David Levithan’s How We Met & Other Stories because one of the stories in it inspired my very first proper short story, that was followed by another four over the course of the year. It’s the short story I read at a talent show in New Hampshire this summer, that led to a fellow writer telling me I inspired her and writing a poem about me. It really affected me, and has immense impact on my writing and on my feelings about being a writer in general.

  • Book you can’t believe you waited UNTIL 2013 to finally read?

 I don’t think I have an answer for this one. I guess 1984 could qualify, but on the other hand I’m very glad I read it at this certain point in my life, so it doesn’t really answer the question.

  • Favorite Passage/Quote From A Book You Read In 2013?
  1. “Yes, expenses were, well, expensive in the Bahamas, Mrs. Sauskind, it is in the nature of expenses to be so. Hence the name.” – Terry Jones, Starship Titanic
  2. The Electric Monk’s day was going tremendously well and he broke into an excited gallop. That is to say that, excitedly, he spurred his horse to a gallop and, unexcitedly, his horse broke into it. – Terry Jones, Starship Titanic
  3. “Well, yes. But it takes a village to raise a child, as they say in Africa…””If you’ve got a village. But if you don’t, then maybe it just takes two people.” – Room, Emma Donoghue
  4. “You’re afraid of monsters, aren’t you?””It depends on the monster, if it’s a real one or not and if it’s where I am.”  – Room, Emma Donoghue
  5. “I don’t know,” says Ma. “How could he not? If he’s the least bit human…” I thought humans were or weren’t, I didn’t know someone could be a bit human. Then what are his other bits? – Room, Emma Donoghue
  6. Lucy had a good brain even though she had lived all her life in LA.Despite the continual exposure to carbon monoxide and people from the film industry, she had remained smart. – Terry Jones, Starship Titanic
  • Shortest & Longest Book You Read In 2013?

84, Charing Cross Road by Helene Hanff. So short yet so good. Shut Your Eyes Tight by John Verdon. Took me three months (minus 3 days, longest time I’ve every spent on on book in all of my almost 17 years on this planet.

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*I’ve decided to cut this at seven questions because of length considerations, expect the remaining ten in the last part!

Christmas Cracker Book Tag

Hey y’all. So I was catching up on posts from blogs I follow and I came across Pretty Books‘ post doing this tag, who found it  through Christmas Cracker Book Tag (video), created by Lucy @ The Bumbling Bibliophile and Queen of Contemporary. I went over the questions and decided to have a go at it myself, despite the fact that I don’t celebrate Christmas (and Hannukah is already over).

Pick a book with a wintry cover.

The Tenth Circle by Jodi Picoult. I read the book quite a while ago, but I’m pretty sure they end up in Alaska or something somewhere in it. Anyhow, it has a mittened and coated girl on a snowy background in the front so I think it covers the category pretty well.

Pick a book you’re likely buy as a present.

I feel like I’m repeating myself because I’ve mentioned these two in my Annual Book Survey Pt. 1 post, but these would have to be Beauty Queens by Libba Bray and World Cup Wishes (משאלה אחת ימינה) by Eshkol Nevo. 10000%.

Pick a festive themed book.

I’m really proud of my choice for this one – The Latke Who Couldn’t StopScreaming by Lemony Snicket. I think I read this in a book store and I literally remember almost nothing except the fact that it was, by far, the weirdest book I’d ever read. I think that’s really all that needs to be said.

Pick a book you can curl up with by the fireplace.

I’m never very good at answering these because I’ve never been the kind of person who chooses books based on where they are. I mean, of course I might choose a couple of light reading books after finishing an intense one, or a classic, but it rarely has to do with where I am. I also tend to read lots of… disturbing books, so not sure how good those are for a fireplace curl up. Maybe Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins? Not too short, not too long, great writing, great story. Lots of love, movies and French stuff.

Pick a book you want to read over the festive period.

Hannukah’s passed and I spent half of it with friends, discussing the tests the following week and the other half studying for said tests. Barely got to read at all. I really need to get a move on with my book. *quietly runs off before anyone notices I didn’t answer the question*

Pick a book that’s so good it gives you chills.

Room by Emma Donoghue. Just… yes. That’s all. One of my all-time favorites.

Pick a book going on your Christmas wishlist.

Again, no Christmas wishlist, friends. Instead I’m choosing a book I want to read and already know will be hard to find out here so many miles away from the United States. Maus by Art Spiegelman. Tara @ The Librarian Who Doesn’t Say “Shhh” mentioned it in a post during her Graphic Novel week posts and it seemed pretty awesome. It’s a book talking about a man’s Holocaust story in which the people are drawn as animals. Also, I’d like to try out a graphic novel, see if I like it.

Tis all for now. These tags are always fun to fill out, definitely thinking of writing up my own sometime. Kay, guys, your turn to fill it out. Link your answers or share them in a comment below! Happy Holidays!

Annual End of Year Book Survey – 2013 – Part 1(/3)

On Sunday Perpetual Page Turner posted her 4th Annual End of Year Book Survey and reading her post made me want to write up my own, and by doing so finally returning to blogging. The year isn’t over yet but since I’ve given up on completing both Eclectic Reader’s Challenges and I’m so busy I’ve decided to only finish the 2012 one which requires finishing my current – Shut Your Eyes Tight by John Verdon, and reading a horror book – most likely Thomas Harris’s Silence of the Lambs. If I decide to include either of those in the post I’ll edit it. For now, this is it.

(I’m going to be splitting the post into THREE parts, each answering NINE questions..)

  •  Best Book You Read In 2013?

Oh god. What’s with all of the “favorite” questions?! You guys know I can never answer these! I’m terrible at choosing just one. Let’s try narrowing it to… Top 5 *not in any particular order.

  1. World Cup Wishes (משאלה אחת ימינה) – Eshkol Nevo
  2. Beauty Queens – Libba Bray
  3. Room – Emma Donoghue
  4. 84, Charing Cross Road – Helene Hanff
  5. Q & A – Vikas Swarup
  • 2. Book You Were Excited About & Thought You Were Going To Love More But Didn’t?

Red Dragon by Thomas Harris. It was my second attempt at horror, following last year’s Cell by Stephen King which I didn’t even finish out of boredom. Unfortunately, it wasn’t much better. I just wasn’t… scared. It’s part of the Hannibal Lecter series and it was supposed to be terrifying and it wasn’t. Definitely disappointing. 

  • Most surprising (in agood way!) book of 2013?

84, Charing Cross Road by Helene Hanff.The book is an epistolary novel and I haven’t read many of those because I somewhere early on developed a dislike for them. My mom recommended this one to me and since it was short I gave it a try and fell in love. It’s a wonderful book and manages to deliver a very powerful story in so few words.

  • Book you read in 2013 that you recommended to people most in 2013?

I guess this would be a tie between two – Eshkol Nevo’s World Cup Wishes (משאלה אחת ימינה) and Beauty Queens by Libba Bray. I ended up buying both books, on seperate occasions, as birthday gifts. Or was it both of them for one person? Not sure. Anyway, both absolutely wonderful and both highly recommended by me to any living creature with reading abilities.

  • Best series you discovered in 2013?

The only two books I read that are part of a series are Thomas Harris’s Red Dragon (1/4 Hannibal Lecter franchise) and Dirk Gentley’s Hollistic Detective Agency by Douglas Adams (one of two Dirk Gentley novels). Both were pretty disappointing compared with my expectations. Douglas Adams did live up to his God of all Writers status I have in my brain so in that sense he was the best, but neither were fantastic.

  • Favorite new author you discovered in 2013?

Definitely Eshkol Nevo. I rarely read Hebrew and I will definitely be reading more of his books now.

  • Best book that was out of your comfort zone or was a new genre for you?

1984 by George Orwell. First dystopian novel! I think it’ll take a while before I get used to the kind of book endings that go with this genre. That kind of simultaniously satisfying and unsatisfying and ugh I wanna hug the writer but also kill him kind of thing.

  • Most thrilling, unputdownable book in 2013?

Room by Emma Donoghue. Read it in two days. I have no words to describe my love for this pile of paper, or in this case electronic text cause I read it on my Kindle during my book craze week in June.

  • Book You Read In 2013 That You Are Most Likely To Re-Read Next Year?

Hm. This is a tough one. I’m gonna go with 1984 by George Orwell just because it seems like the kind of book that needs to be read more than once. I didn’t care much for the plot and the characters but the whole political and social aspect is what got my attention.

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It’s cool to go over my reading log for the year and see what different things I’ve read this year and look at them through these questions. Twenty seven questions in one post is definitely too much so rather than bombard y’all with a ton of info all at once I’ll make a three part series for the survey instead. That way I can answer more at length and you guys have more patience to read it all.

If anyone else wants to do the survey or has already done it be sure to credit Jamie @ Perpetual Page Turner and please comment with a link to your own post so we can all see your choices too! 

Long Time No See

Hey everyone. It’s been… a while, to say the least. Life’s been busy and I slowly gave up my book blogging in favor of other crazy things I need to start thinking about now that I’m getting older. However, a couple of days ago I came across a Book Survey by Perpetual Page Turner that I liked, and it got me to thinking about returning. I have to admit I’m kind of worried – I’ve been missing for so long. I’m shocked to discover I’m still getting views – even if they are very few – and that I’m only one follower away from 100. All of this is even cooler because apparently today is my WordPress account’s one year anniversary! So yes, I guess this post signals my return. I don’t know yet if I’m going to return to my nearly daily blogging, or maybe spread out some more, but I’m back. 

Top Ten Tuesday – A Cheater’s Combination (October 8th)

Hey folks! Another Tuesday has arrived, and with it another The Broke and the Bookish Top Ten Tuesday meme post! However, I’d decided to stray from the offered topic and to COMBINE two from the old ones I’ve never done instead! As I’ve mentioned ENDLESS times before, I haven’t been reading many series lately and so I feel like this week’s topic of best/worst series endings isn’t very relevant for me. Instead, I’ve decided to go with

Top Ten Auto-Buy Authors + Top Ten Books For People Who Liked X Author 

And create the hybrid I’m now titling – Top Ten Auto-Buy Authors and Their Best Book I’ve Read

*best book shall be colored in a lovely blue

Let’s get to it!

  1. Douglas Adams – anyone who’s been following me for over a week will probably have noticed this man’s name come up… quite a bit. No need to elaborate – he’s mentioned all over my posts. The man is a genius. His writing is freaking fantastic. Books I’ve read: Hitchiker’s Guide Series (1-5), Dirk Gentley’s Hollistic Detective Agency, *Douglas Adam’s Starship Titanic – A Novel By Terry Jones – The Hitchiker’s Guide to the Galaxy
  2. Libba Bray – enjoyed Going Bovine, fell in love during Beauty Queens. Bought two more of her books when I was in the US in August, can’t wait to get to ’em. Books I’ve read: Going Bovine, Beauty Queens – Beauty Queens
  3. John Green – his books basically define my favorite genre. Sophisticated Young Adult, I like to call it. I have to admit, I’m kind of sick of the whole intellectual teen type thing, but he just does it so well. Books I’ve read: Will Grayson, Will Grayson, The Fault in Our Stars – TFiOS (although WGWG was wonderful, but I think it’s less… likeable by most, as opposed to TFiOS which was literally loved by every human who ever read it)
  4. Daniel Handler aka Lemony Snicket – read Series of Unfortunate Events in 3rd grade, rediscovered him as a young adult writer sometime last year. Another author where the writing matters more than the plot. Books I’ve read: Series of Unfortunate Events (1-12.5), Why We Broke Up, The Latke Who Couldn’t Stop Screaming – Why We Broke Up
  5. JK Rowling  – got A Casual Vacancy the day after it came out – only b/c I assumed it wouldn’t come out in Israel the very same day it did in England. Gotta say it kinda threw me off JK – the writing was wonderful, the plot bore me to death. The week I finally gave up on it I read FIVE WHOLE OTHER BOOKS and rediscovered my Kindle and its wonders. Now I’m slightly more hesitant with her, not gonna lie. Books I’ve read: Harry Potter Series (1-7), 1/3 of A Casual Vacancy – Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone
  6. Jodi Picoult – again, one I’ve cooled down with. I had a crazy Picoult stage after I read My Sister’s Keeper and then recognized her name on Plain Truth at the library I never visit and hate. After that I devoured her books, and I own nearly ten, I think, although I kind of took a break from her, she got sort of… repetative with her style and endings and I kind of lost interest – although that didn’t stop me from continuing to buy her work. Might return soon. Books I’ve read: My Sister’s Keeper, Plain Truth, Nineteen Minutes, The Pact, The Tenth Circle, House Rules – My Sister’s Keeper
  7. Daniel Levithan – insta-love after Will Grayson, Will Grayson. Books I’ve read – Will Grayson, Will Grayson, How We Met & Other Stories – Will Grayson, Will Grayson (I refuse to let John Green outshine him)
  8. Stephanie Perkins – I’ll admit, I’ve only read one of hers, but there was something really simple and easy to like about it. If I come across more, I’ll definitely check ’em out. Books I’ve read: Anna and the French Kiss – obvious.

Well, what did y’all think of my hybrid? Feel free to use it on your own blog, or create your own hybrids for those Tuesdays where the theme just doesn’t fit your needs! Share any of my choices? Have good ones of your own? Lemme know, and if some of mine were new go try them out – I gaurantee fantastic-ness for all of them!

Monday Musings – October 7th

The Monday meme, hosted by Should Be Reading, in which we… muse about stuff!

• Instead of the above questions, maybe you just want to ramble on about something else pertaining to books — let’s hear it, then!

As y’all know, I’m attempting to complete TWO Ecelctic Reader’s Challenges this year. I think this is a bit… much. I took one on last year as a challenge, but the combination of never letting things going along with OCD has lead me to repeat it this year due to my 2012 failure. (I BLAME YOU, STEPHEN KING). Anyhow, I’m redoing it, but I’m also doing the 2013 one. I really want to finish them but I have all of the… not as much my type genres left and 11 books to read in three very intense school months. Thing is, if I don’t finish at least 2012 I’m not going to do THREE next year. So I’m kind of stressed. Hm. Yeah, it’s a silly rant and a silly problem but it’s been on my mind lately. I might just try completing the 2012 one so I don’t have to drag it on forever. Right now I’m kind of stuck in my book b/c I’m not really into it. We’ll see what I do.

Anyone else struggling with challenges?

Top Ten Tuesday – Book Turnoffs (October 1st)

This week’s topic for Top Ten Tuesday, brought to you as usual by the lovely ladies over at The Broke and the Bookish is:

Top Ten Book Turn-Offs 

This topic reminds me of the one we did a while back regarding book COVER turnoffs, though this one has to do with plots. To make it more interesting I’m also going to include certain plot-lines that usually affect my liking of certain characters. 

  1. Cheating – I find it very hard to like cheaters in books. Tom Perrotta’s Little Children proved to me that this isn’t exactly 100% true, but I do struggle with liking people once I know they’ve cheated.
  2. Bad Boy Falls for Nerdy Girl – these aren’t nessecarily bad, there are just WAY too many of them and they tend to all follow the same template. Repetitive? No thanks.
  3. Girl’s Entire World is Saved by Guy – I mean this not in the supernatural sense, but in the oh-I’m-so-clumsy-and-weak-and-silly-I-need-a-man-to-save-me sense. (ahem ahem Twilight?) I don’t mind infatuation, I just don’t really think books that perpetuate the stereotypical weak woman needing a man are very good for promoting progress and change in society, and that’s one of the things books are supposed to do.
  4. Historical – again, not 100% true, but I tend to go for more modern stories. I’m not a big fan of historical fiction. I’d say most of the stories in the books I read take place no more than… thirty years ago. I like feeling like I’m in the character’s world and recognize things that relate to myself. I mean, you can “get lost” in historical novels as well, but for example one thing I found lovely in the Pretty Little Liars series was that they’d suddenly mention some famous singer or movie and I’d be like OHMYGODTHAT’SFROMREALLIFE and it was great.
  5. Absent Parents – at least give us an explanation! Maybe they don’t care much, work late, are busy, etc. But there is NO way a teenager spends an entire novel not mentioning them even ONCE. I know there’s a spectrum for parental involvement, but even when they aren’t there they still exist in the kid’s brain – so SAY SOMETHING ABOUT IT.
  6. Very Big Books – I’ve mentioned this multiple times on this blog, my downward spiral from big-book-lover child to -big-book-coward… older person. I feel like big books are this huge burden, this huge commitment and that I’ll never ever finish them. The Kindle has actually helped with that, not seeing the book in pyhsical form makes it easier mentally to take on, despite the length.
  7. Long Series – something I used to love and no longer do. When I read a series I read it in proper order and straight through, so taking on long series means committing to something specific for a very long time and I don’t like doing that. 
  8. Very Long Nature Descriptions – no thanks. Everyone told me The Hobit’s full of ’em, but it turned out pretty okay. I understand the desire to create a believable setting, but sometimes it’s just too much.
  9. Sci-fi Books That Break Their Own Universe Rules  – I’m perfectly alright with stories taking place in fictional worlds, but if there’s a set of rules in said universe YOU. MUST. STICK. TO. THEM. You CANNOT break your rules for the sake of a plot-line, even if you’re the one who wrote them. No. It makes it seem messy, not well thought through and hard to believe. Stop it.
  10. Tiny Font – tiny font can make even the smallest book feel like #6 Very Big Books. Why must you print so tiny? It makes me give up before I’ve even started. Plus, not a big fan of squinting, thank you very much.

So, that’s it! This was actually an interesting one… y’all should give it a go! Lemme know your answers – link, comment, whatever. Go go go!