Top Ten Tuesday – Book Turnoffs (October 1st)

This week’s topic for Top Ten Tuesday, brought to you as usual by the lovely ladies over at The Broke and the Bookish is:

Top Ten Book Turn-Offs 

This topic reminds me of the one we did a while back regarding book COVER turnoffs, though this one has to do with plots. To make it more interesting I’m also going to include certain plot-lines that usually affect my liking of certain characters. 

  1. Cheating – I find it very hard to like cheaters in books. Tom Perrotta’s Little Children proved to me that this isn’t exactly 100% true, but I do struggle with liking people once I know they’ve cheated.
  2. Bad Boy Falls for Nerdy Girl – these aren’t nessecarily bad, there are just WAY too many of them and they tend to all follow the same template. Repetitive? No thanks.
  3. Girl’s Entire World is Saved by Guy – I mean this not in the supernatural sense, but in the oh-I’m-so-clumsy-and-weak-and-silly-I-need-a-man-to-save-me sense. (ahem ahem Twilight?) I don’t mind infatuation, I just don’t really think books that perpetuate the stereotypical weak woman needing a man are very good for promoting progress and change in society, and that’s one of the things books are supposed to do.
  4. Historical – again, not 100% true, but I tend to go for more modern stories. I’m not a big fan of historical fiction. I’d say most of the stories in the books I read take place no more than… thirty years ago. I like feeling like I’m in the character’s world and recognize things that relate to myself. I mean, you can “get lost” in historical novels as well, but for example one thing I found lovely in the Pretty Little Liars series was that they’d suddenly mention some famous singer or movie and I’d be like OHMYGODTHAT’SFROMREALLIFE and it was great.
  5. Absent Parents – at least give us an explanation! Maybe they don’t care much, work late, are busy, etc. But there is NO way a teenager spends an entire novel not mentioning them even ONCE. I know there’s a spectrum for parental involvement, but even when they aren’t there they still exist in the kid’s brain – so SAY SOMETHING ABOUT IT.
  6. Very Big Books – I’ve mentioned this multiple times on this blog, my downward spiral from big-book-lover child to -big-book-coward… older person. I feel like big books are this huge burden, this huge commitment and that I’ll never ever finish them. The Kindle has actually helped with that, not seeing the book in pyhsical form makes it easier mentally to take on, despite the length.
  7. Long Series – something I used to love and no longer do. When I read a series I read it in proper order and straight through, so taking on long series means committing to something specific for a very long time and I don’t like doing that. 
  8. Very Long Nature Descriptions – no thanks. Everyone told me The Hobit’s full of ’em, but it turned out pretty okay. I understand the desire to create a believable setting, but sometimes it’s just too much.
  9. Sci-fi Books That Break Their Own Universe Rules  – I’m perfectly alright with stories taking place in fictional worlds, but if there’s a set of rules in said universe YOU. MUST. STICK. TO. THEM. You CANNOT break your rules for the sake of a plot-line, even if you’re the one who wrote them. No. It makes it seem messy, not well thought through and hard to believe. Stop it.
  10. Tiny Font – tiny font can make even the smallest book feel like #6 Very Big Books. Why must you print so tiny? It makes me give up before I’ve even started. Plus, not a big fan of squinting, thank you very much.

So, that’s it! This was actually an interesting one… y’all should give it a go! Lemme know your answers – link, comment, whatever. Go go go!

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2 responses

  1. Historical is my passion, the genre I’ve lived and breathed for about 25 years, since I was eight years old. Modern books have never done much for me. The longer a book is, the more eager I am to read it, in comparison to all these 288-page books I see in the modern era.

    I agree about long nature descriptions, and long flowery descriptions in general. I still remember how I read The Age of Innocence for a book report in my eighth grade history class, by skipping all the descriptive passages that in no way advanced the plot.

    1. We’re exactly the opposite! Have any good historical fiction recommendations to get into the genre?

      I never skip, which is why I just avoid them in the first place.

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